Flutejuice

Be yourself, everyone else is taken. Oscar Wilde

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Sand animation by Kseniya Simonova




The Captain and the Hourglass | Laura Marling


19 plays

jedavu:

STREET ART AGAINST CONSUMERISM

by  Los Angeles-based artist Plastic Jesus

(via twitchytwitchtwitch)



[Video] The Indelible Artistry Behind Oscar-Nominated Animated Film, ‘Ernest And Celestine’



a painting

a painting

(Source: jenz, via perf0ratededges)



designcube:

'In a World Without Words' by Ina Jang

(Source: ignant.de)



2 initial ideas pencil sketches to start off my ‘body armour’ fashion project! It’s my first Friday night off work since September and I’m spending it drinking copious amounts of coffee and doing my coursework, how sad

2 initial ideas pencil sketches to start off my ‘body armour’ fashion project! It’s my first Friday night off work since September and I’m spending it drinking copious amounts of coffee and doing my coursework, how sad




The Smiths | Wonderful Woman


90 plays

darksilenceinsuburbia:

Simon Birch.

Website



We Two Boys Together Clinging | David Hockney  
Created by a young David Hockney whilst in his second year at the Royal College of Art at a time when homosexuality was still illegal in England, this piece expresses the artist’s sexuality and frustration in a number of ways.  
Perhaps most obvious is the immediate reference in the title to the Walt Whitman poem of the same name, Two lines of this poem are used in the piece, crossing over the figures and providing a description of their actions. The background is the blue of a cubicle in a public toilet block; the two figures are hidden from the outside world – and the law. 
The figures themselves are formed using sketchy, rough marks, their crudeness mirroring the style of graffiti found on the walls inside dirty, back-street public toilets. I feel that the child-like drawing style represents a certain naivety, perhaps virginity; the artist himself was only in his early twenties when he produced his image and this is possibly a reflection of his exploration of his own sexuality. This style also serves the purpose of masking the figures, giving them a sense of mock-anonymity – a poignant comment on a society in which exposing such a relationship publicly could result in serious consequences. 
In terms of colour, red is commonly associated with feelings of intense passion and love, and the artist uses this effectively in order to create a stark contrast against the dreary greys and blues of the cubicle walls behind them. The scratchy lines ‘stitching’ the figures together is another visual representation of their embrace, this as opposed to the soft, delicate lines used in many traditional paintings with love as the subject matter suggests frantic movements and a sense of urgency between the couple.  
A newspaper clipping is also referenced in this piece: the headline, ‘two boys cling to a cliff all night’ describes a climbing accident. The words, ‘two boys’ ‘cling’ and ‘all night’ fit with the title of the painting itself, however the artist includes this line for another purpose - the word ‘cliff’ is an allusion to his idol and a popular icon amongst homosexual men at the time, Cliff Richard. 
When taking social context into consideration, in my opinion the sheer weight of the meaning behind this piece is incredible: created in 1961, an image with such a clear subject matter and lack of subtlety would have been seen as shocking - I imagine that by creating such a personal and emotive piece, Hockney was taking an enormous risk. If any evidence of the artist having had relationships with men had been found, he could have faced being thrown out of college and even arrested. On the other hand, however, many homosexual men of the time used a mixture of pop culture and art as a visual language in which to express themselves and reach out to one another - many feel that the pop art movement played an essential part in the eventual legalisation of homosexuality in both the UK and the US.

We Two Boys Together Clinging | David Hockney  

Created by a young David Hockney whilst in his second year at the Royal College of Art at a time when homosexuality was still illegal in England, this piece expresses the artist’s sexuality and frustration in a number of ways.  

Perhaps most obvious is the immediate reference in the title to the Walt Whitman poem of the same name, Two lines of this poem are used in the piece, crossing over the figures and providing a description of their actions. The background is the blue of a cubicle in a public toilet block; the two figures are hidden from the outside world – and the law. 

The figures themselves are formed using sketchy, rough marks, their crudeness mirroring the style of graffiti found on the walls inside dirty, back-street public toilets. I feel that the child-like drawing style represents a certain naivety, perhaps virginity; the artist himself was only in his early twenties when he produced his image and this is possibly a reflection of his exploration of his own sexuality. This style also serves the purpose of masking the figures, giving them a sense of mock-anonymity – a poignant comment on a society in which exposing such a relationship publicly could result in serious consequences. 

In terms of colour, red is commonly associated with feelings of intense passion and love, and the artist uses this effectively in order to create a stark contrast against the dreary greys and blues of the cubicle walls behind them. The scratchy lines ‘stitching’ the figures together is another visual representation of their embrace, this as opposed to the soft, delicate lines used in many traditional paintings with love as the subject matter suggests frantic movements and a sense of urgency between the couple.  

A newspaper clipping is also referenced in this piece: the headline, ‘two boys cling to a cliff all night’ describes a climbing accident. The words, ‘two boys’ ‘cling’ and ‘all night’ fit with the title of the painting itself, however the artist includes this line for another purpose - the word ‘cliff’ is an allusion to his idol and a popular icon amongst homosexual men at the time, Cliff Richard. 

When taking social context into consideration, in my opinion the sheer weight of the meaning behind this piece is incredible: created in 1961, an image with such a clear subject matter and lack of subtlety would have been seen as shocking - I imagine that by creating such a personal and emotive piece, Hockney was taking an enormous risk. If any evidence of the artist having had relationships with men had been found, he could have faced being thrown out of college and even arrested. On the other hand, however, many homosexual men of the time used a mixture of pop culture and art as a visual language in which to express themselves and reach out to one another - many feel that the pop art movement played an essential part in the eventual legalisation of homosexuality in both the UK and the US.



Two Fried Eggs and a Kebab | Sarah Lucas
In this piece the artist constructs a reclining female nude from inanimate objects; some food items, which represent that the female body is to be ‘consumed’. The sexual position of the body and the nature of the objects used have the appearance of something schoolboys or men in a pub would put together for a laugh – this in itself represents the way in which the female form is treated in modern society.
My favourite thing about this piece is its subtlety, as it takes the viewer a second to ‘see’ the body. I sent my friend this picture and his reaction summed it up perfectly:

I was like, “this is dumb. I don’t like this. I’m going to tell Kat that the kebab looks like a vagi-OH MY GOD”
I like it.

- Joss

Two Fried Eggs and a Kebab | Sarah Lucas

In this piece the artist constructs a reclining female nude from inanimate objects; some food items, which represent that the female body is to be ‘consumed’. The sexual position of the body and the nature of the objects used have the appearance of something schoolboys or men in a pub would put together for a laugh – this in itself represents the way in which the female form is treated in modern society.

My favourite thing about this piece is its subtlety, as it takes the viewer a second to ‘see’ the body. I sent my friend this picture and his reaction summed it up perfectly:

I was like, “this is dumb. I don’t like this. I’m going to tell Kat that the kebab looks like a vagi-OH MY GOD”

I like it.

- Joss



I need to start Tumbl’ing again

My boyfriend and I had an argument last week and ever since we’ve been doing that thing where we’re being stiffly polite but distant. Anyway I got a text from him the other day saying we’re going out on Thursday night, but he won’t tell me where as it’s a surprise. He then sent another text saying ‘Don’t eat too much’. I suppose this could mean we’re going for a meal or something but he’s probably just trying to tell me I’m getting fat.

I start my second year of college on monday hm



"Sad thing is, you can still love someone and be wrong for them." Elvis Presley (via mermaidporn)

(Source: quotethat, via disfiguredisolation-deactivated)



eatsleepdraw:

1960’s Living room.
daniellongillustration.tumblr.com

eatsleepdraw:

1960’s Living room.

daniellongillustration.tumblr.com



(via aspiring-disney-princess)